AfriREP

Researching sexuality with young women: Southern Africa

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dc.contributor.author Bennett, Jane
dc.contributor.author Bradbury, Jill
dc.contributor.author Kiguwa, Peace
dc.contributor.author Mosime, Sethunya. T.
dc.contributor.author Ntshwarang, Pholoko
dc.contributor.author Mookodi, Godisang
dc.contributor.author Hames, Mary
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-28T15:02:17Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-28T15:02:17Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.citation © in published edition: African Gender Institute, University of Cape Town, South Africa, 2012 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1726-4596
dc.identifier.uri http://www.agi.ac.za/sites/default/files/image_tool/images/429/feminist_africa_journals/archive/17/fa17_text_web.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://awdflibrary.org:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/956
dc.description.abstract This issue of Feminist Africa is a special edition which foregrounds the research created, with the young women, through the five different teams. Jill Bradbury and Peace Kiguwa, working with a team of young women, write about their own visual mapping of the University of the Witwatersrand as a way of re-seeing campus streets and surroundings in terms of sexual pleasure and sexual vulnerability. Sethunya Mosime, Poloko Ntshwarang, and Godisang Mookodi from the University of Botswana focused on the use of personal story-telling to generate dialogue about sexual conventions and the negotiation of gendered expectations for young women on campus, and off. Pieces by Tanja Bosch and Susan Holland-Muter, of the University of Cape Town, Lucy Edwards-Jauch from the University of Namibia, and by Naomi Wekwete and Charity Manyureke of the University of Zimbabwe add texture and diversity to the articles’ analysis of the work with young women on questions of gender-based violence and policy, the politics of space and sexuality, the meaning of HIV-prevention campaigns, and the politics of gender and sexual pleasure. In five teams, very interesting, cross-generational action research projects were developed, and the material presented in Feminist Africa 17 is rich with potential for theory on what it means to take up SRHR work where young women’s lives are concerned. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher African Gender Institute en_US
dc.subject sexuality en_US
dc.subject Young women en_US
dc.subject Southern African en_US
dc.title Researching sexuality with young women: Southern Africa en_US
dc.title.alternative Travels in “fashionable” sexuality research: Thoughts from home en_US
dc.title.alternative Thinking Women’s Worlds en_US
dc.title.alternative Mapping sexualities and sexual body politics on University of Botswana Campus: A feminist action research approach en_US
dc.title.alternative Embodying the Learning Space: Is it okay if I bring my sexuality to class? en_US
dc.type Other en_US


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