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Gender, Poverty and Inequality in the Aftermath of Zimbabwe’s Land Reform: A Transformative Social Policy Perspective

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dc.contributor.author Tekwa, Newman
dc.contributor.author Adesina, Jimi
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-28T12:24:49Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-28T12:24:49Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://awdflibrary.org:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/700
dc.description.abstract Gender equality is re-emerging as an important global and national agenda with emphasis placed on closing the gender gap in terms of women’s representation in public and private decision-making bodies. Though unrelatedly, the period had coincided with the elevation of social protection in the form of cash transfers as the magic bullet in tackling gendered poverty and inequality. Adopting a Transformative Social Policy Framework and land reform as a social policy instrument, the paper questions the efficacy of the current approaches in transforming gendered poverty and inequalities. Land reform is hardly ever assessed as a policy instrument for its redistributive, productive, social protection and social reproduction functions. This paper departs from ‘classical models’ of land reforms, often designed in the mould of neo-liberal discourses of individual tenure to offer an in-depth reformulation of the land question and notions of land reforms. It focuses on land reform as a relational question with potential for social transformation as social policies within the transformative social policy framework relates not only to protection from destitution, but transformation of social institutions and relations including gender. In the year 2000, the Zimbabwean government embarked on a radical land reform programme whose redistributive outcomes saw various categories of women (married, single, and widowed) comprising 12-18% of beneficiaries gaining access to land in their own right. Data gathered through a mixed methods approach combining ethnographic and survey methods and analysed using qualitative and quantitative methods, suggest that access to larger pieces of land, irrigation, credit, markets and support training services by both women and men had transformed women’s social and economic situation in relation to men within the resettled areas. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Journal of International Women’s Studies;Vol. 19, No. 5
dc.subject Gender en_US
dc.subject Poverty en_US
dc.subject Inequality en_US
dc.subject Land reform en_US
dc.subject Transformative social policy en_US
dc.subject Ethnographic en_US
dc.subject Social and Economic situation en_US
dc.title Gender, Poverty and Inequality in the Aftermath of Zimbabwe’s Land Reform: A Transformative Social Policy Perspective en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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