AfriREP

Women Professional Associations: A Response to Gender Inequality Between the Private and Public Spheres

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dc.contributor.author Adesanya, Aderonke Adesola
dc.date.accessioned 2018-05-16T15:31:17Z
dc.date.available 2018-05-16T15:31:17Z
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier.uri http://awdflibrary.org:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/502
dc.description.abstract Men and women across racial and class divides have disparaged women’s organisations at various times and places (Abdullah 1995; and Molyneux 1998). The literature is replete with the tendency to categorize and label women groups and as ‘elitist, middle-class, academic’ (Reddock 1991:19). Other descriptions have included ‘militant’, ‘short term’, and ‘propagandist’. But a critical look at such categorization suggests that the rapidity in condemnation can be traced to an inadequate examination of women’s organisations. Moreover, as Reddock (1991) opines, it is necessary for gender scholars to study all organisations, to find out who joins them and why such groups continue to be popular. This is even more important for this researcher, as there is little reference to women’s participation in worker’s organisations (Sokunbi et al. 1995) and especially little reference in existing literature to their involvement in professional associations. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Women Professional Associations en_US
dc.subject Gender Inequality en_US
dc.subject Private and Public Spheres en_US
dc.subject Literature en_US
dc.subject Involvement en_US
dc.subject New Social Movements en_US
dc.title Women Professional Associations: A Response to Gender Inequality Between the Private and Public Spheres en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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